Tag Archives: aromanticism

Movies With No Romance in Them: Beetlejuice

I love a good romantic movie. Ask me about how many times I’ve watched Pride and Prejudice, if you want to listen to me talk for like 7 uninterrupted minutes. But sometimes it feels like the film industry forgets that there are other forms of meaningful human experience OTHER THAN ROMANCE. So I get excited about non-romantic films sometimes.

This is an interesting one, because the strongest relationship in the movie is a romantic one: that between the married couple Barbara and Adam. But their romance isn’t the SUBJECT of the movie. Instead it’s portrayed as a simple obvious fact that they love and support each other and act as a team. Is it weird that I find this so refreshing to see in a Hollywood movie? I feel like we don’t get this a lot.

Aside from that background romance, there isn’t any hint of romance in the plot of the movie, which instead revolves around death, isolation, authenticity, and familial bonds. And watching an adorable waifish baby Winona Rider be a teeny goth out of water.Lydia from Beetlejuice

 

Movies With No Romance In Them: Captain America: The Winter Soldier

I love a good romantic movie. Ask me about how many times I’ve watched Pride and Prejudice, if you want to listen to me talk for like 7 uninterrupted minutes. But sometimes it feels like the film industry forgets that there are other forms of meaningful human experience OTHER THAN ROMANCE. So I get excited about non-romantic films sometimes.

There are a few minor elements of romance in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, but they’re not very annoying and they don’t encroach on the main plot.

The movie that this movie is a sequel to (is there a better phrase for that?) had a romance between Steve Rogers and Peggy Carter as a significant sub-plot. But, being almost entirely free of misogynistic romance tropes, and carried off by some excellent acting, it was enjoyable.

Steve and Peggy

Winter Soldier, on the other hand, has only the following hints of romance:

  • Steve being sad that he can’t be with Peggy
  • Natasha Romanoff trying to set Steve up on dates because she’s sick of him being such a sad puppy all the time
  • A brief overture of Steve asking his neighbor out on a date

These probably take up about five minutes of screen time total. Like Pacific Rim, this is definitely a movie about the importance of friendship (in it’s many forms), and the strongest relationships in the movie are between Steve and Natasha (a complex friendship), Steve and Sam Wilson (a meet-cute-turned-comerades-in-arms friendship, which if it was not a trope before, I now demand become an immensely popular Hollywood trope), and of course, between the two eponymous characters, Steve and Bucky (I would call it a romantic friendship, though it depends on who you ask).

I love superhero movies with well-done romance plots (the first Captain America, Iron Man 2-3, The Superman one with Kate Bosworth) and I even sometimes like superhero movies with corny and shoe-horned romance (Batman Returns, The Incredible Hulk [the Ed Norton one], pretty much all the X-Men movies [ugh, shut up about Logan/Jean already, movies]). But I really, really want more non-romantic superhero movies. Who do I have to bribe to get Black Widow origin movie with no romance?

Movies With No Romance In Them: Pacific Rim

I love a good romantic movie. Ask me about how many times I’ve watched Pride and Prejudice, if you want to listen to me talk for like 7 uninterrupted minutes. But sometimes it feels like the film industry forgets that there are other forms of meaningful human experience OTHER THAN ROMANCE. So I get excited about non-romantic films sometimes.

You could argue this one with me and say that the two main characters of Pacific Rim, Raleigh Beckett and Mako Mori, are in fact in a romantic relationship. But you would be wrong, very very wrong.

Raleigh and Mako have a romantic friendship, which is a very different and very awesome thing that we need more of in movies. (Although I do think the film sets up a strong possibility of future romance between the characters.) In the triumphant ending scene of the movie, when Mako and Raleigh share a moment of relief and joy, they embrace and lean their foreheads against each other.  This is the moment where I started mentally chanting don’t kiss, don’t kiss, don’t kiss.

Pacific Rim Ending Scene

And they don’t!! Although they’re one of the strongest relationships in the movie, and have been explicitly shown to be, well, soul mates (“drift compatible” is a wonderful term), they do not kiss. No making out occurs whatsoever.

The only romantic references I can recall in the movie are: a) two of the side characters being married to each other (the Russians) which is a very minor point and b) one character referencing his dead wife. Other than those two small, non-intrusive instances, romance plays no role in the movie. This is made all the more awesome by the fact that it’s a movie all about the strength and importance of human relationships. The most important relationships in this relationship movie are:

  • Romantic friendship (Raleigh and Mak0)
  • Sibling relationship (Raleigh and Yancey)
  • Father and adopted daughter (Mako and Stacker Pentecost)
  • Father and son (Herc and Chuck)
  • A disputatious friendship (The two scientists that the fandom is obsessed with for some reason but I don’t even care enough about to look up their names. Newt??)

In conclusion, if you want a movie all about the awesome permutations, other than romance, of human relationships, that also has giant robots punching giant monsters in the face, I have good news for you my friend.

Movies With No Romance In Them: Big Hero 6

I love a good romantic movie. Ask me about how many times I’ve watched Pride and Prejudice, if you want to listen to me talk for like 7 uninterrupted minutes. But sometimes it feels like the film industry forgets that there are other forms of meaningful human experience OTHER THAN ROMANCE. So I get excited about non-romantic films sometimes.

big hero 6 promo imageBig Hero 6, in addition to being an adorable and touching animated super-hero action feature, is probably the least romantic movie I’ve ever seen. If an alien species were to get their hands on this movie as their sole artifact of human culture, they wouldn’t even know romance existed, that’s how un-romantic it is. Which is awesome!

The main character is 14-year-old Hiro, who would usually be a prime candidate for a shoe-horned romantic sub-plot. But not only did they avoid that, none of the side characters were dating each other or had a crush on each other. Although family relationships and friendship are important themes, not one character’s motivation was based on romance.

The plot of the movie involves brilliant but unmotivated robotics genius Hiro, who finds unexpected kinship with a team of rag-tag misfit roboticists. Our team then has to overcome their differences and find faith in themselves in order to save the city. Awesome action and rollicking cartoon adventure then follows, and, I cannot emphasize this enough, at no point does anyone fall in love with anyone else.